Mid winter update

Another cold snap has hit the north island here in New Zealand as we enter the month of July. We hope the bees don’t feel the chill too much but now and then a we do spot few bees leaving the hive on a warm day ( so much for the warm winter that was predicted). We have layered on the blankets in wait for the warmer months.

Incredible jealousy of the brilliant photos and posts showing casing a beautiful season from you Northern Hemisphere bloggers.

Happened upon a great new blog I recommend you all follow: http://mahakobees.tumblr.com


Editor // Bronte Perry

nuthinbutabeethang:

mothernaturenetwork:

Super slow-motion video casts honeybees in new light
A photographer has caught fascinating slow-motion footage of a honeybee hive in New Hampshire, revealing subtle behaviors — like flapping wings, jiggling feet and even a sting — in dramatic detail.

Awesome slow motion video of bees in flight.

niuniente:

Make A Bee Waterer And Help Hydrate Our Pollinators

Imagine how hard just one bee works in a single day. Bees tend to at least 2,000 flowers daily, with tiny wings beating 10,000 times per minute, carrying pollen, and dramatically assisting our food supply.

Sound exhausting? Bees get thirsty, and they need safe water sources. The problem is water is not always available.

Bees need very shallow water to drink from. However, shallow water evaporates quickly. Birdbaths are not the best option as bees tend to drown if the water is not be shallow enough. As for river and lakes, bees risk their lives trying to get water in the presence of fishes, frogs, and other wildlife, not to mention the risk of being swept away in water currents.

To help hydrate our little pollinators, set up a water feeder by filling a pie pan with marbles and then water. The marbles give the bees a spot to land so that they don’t drown when they come to drink. No more drowned bees!

Source: Natural Cures 

looking at you guys >_>

(via radiorcrist)

Australian spider venom could save honey bee

The venom of Australia’s funnel web spider could create a honeybee-friendly biopesticide, a new study suggests.

http://iphone.sciencealert.com.au/news/20140706-25637.html

consultingmoosecaptain:

cannibal-swag:

rasputin:

Portuguese designer Susana Soares has developed a device for detecting cancer and other serious diseases using trained bees. The bees are placed in a glass chamber into which the patient exhales; the bees fly into a smaller secondary chamber if they detect cancer. Scientists have found that honey bees - Apis mellifera - have an extraordinary sense of smell that is more acute than that of a sniffer dog and can detect airborne molecules in the parts-per-trillion range. Bees can be trained to detect specific chemical odours, including the biomarkers associated with diseases such as tuberculosis, lung, skin and pancreatic cancer.
 

how does one train a bee

BEEEEES consultingmoosecaptain:

cannibal-swag:

rasputin:

Portuguese designer Susana Soares has developed a device for detecting cancer and other serious diseases using trained bees. The bees are placed in a glass chamber into which the patient exhales; the bees fly into a smaller secondary chamber if they detect cancer. Scientists have found that honey bees - Apis mellifera - have an extraordinary sense of smell that is more acute than that of a sniffer dog and can detect airborne molecules in the parts-per-trillion range. Bees can be trained to detect specific chemical odours, including the biomarkers associated with diseases such as tuberculosis, lung, skin and pancreatic cancer.
 

how does one train a bee

BEEEEES consultingmoosecaptain:

cannibal-swag:

rasputin:

Portuguese designer Susana Soares has developed a device for detecting cancer and other serious diseases using trained bees. The bees are placed in a glass chamber into which the patient exhales; the bees fly into a smaller secondary chamber if they detect cancer. Scientists have found that honey bees - Apis mellifera - have an extraordinary sense of smell that is more acute than that of a sniffer dog and can detect airborne molecules in the parts-per-trillion range. Bees can be trained to detect specific chemical odours, including the biomarkers associated with diseases such as tuberculosis, lung, skin and pancreatic cancer.
 

how does one train a bee

BEEEEES

consultingmoosecaptain:

cannibal-swag:

rasputin:

Portuguese designer Susana Soares has developed a device for detecting cancer and other serious diseases using trained bees. The bees are placed in a glass chamber into which the patient exhales; the bees fly into a smaller secondary chamber if they detect cancer. 

Scientists have found that honey bees - Apis mellifera - have an extraordinary sense of smell that is more acute than that of a sniffer dog and can detect airborne molecules in the parts-per-trillion range. 

Bees can be trained to detect specific chemical odours, including the biomarkers associated with diseases such as tuberculosis, lung, skin and pancreatic cancer.

 

how does one train a bee

BEEEEES

(via blinded-by-divine)

exitinsistexist:

Blue Carpenter Bee

exitinsistexist:

Blue Carpenter Bee

(via ductility)

Good news and slightly worrying news.
This morning we found some bee lava under the hive that had been emptied out hive by the bees. Firstly this is a brilliant sign that we have a queen laying in the hive. Since the rejection of the queen we tried to introduce, we didn’t know wether they would make new queen before winter come.
But this little lava didn’t make it mostly due to massive chill we experienced Monday, the temperature fell to 1° (unusual for Auckland weather, especially since the news reported a warm winter). The hive is still quite small and is not generating enough warmth to keep these lava warm during these ‘chills’.
Or it could possible be drone lava which the bees are kicking out. My bet is on the first one.

bees eating some honey bees eating some honey

bees eating some honey